WM Sports Equality

Check out this video that was posted by NBAoffseason blog. It is an add for skull candy. Sexist or just funny? Sexist and funny? Think about it.

(Source: youtube.com)

WMST Forum Athletics Poll

THANK YOU SO MUCH TO EVERYONE WHO CAME TO OUR BOOTH AT THE FORUM ESPECIALLY TO THOSE WHO ANSWERED OUR QUESTIONNAIRE

1. Do you find the professional athletes (from one of our past blogs) posing for Sports Illustrated to be:

57%-Demeaning to females

14%-Empowering to females

29%-Neutral

2. How do you think our school’s media is at promoting all sports?

0%-They give equal attention to all sports

86%-They give preference to revenue earning sports (baseball, basketball, football) and this should change

14%-They give preference to revenue earning sports but that is ok because that is what the public wants to hear about

3. How do you think the country’s media promotes all sports?

0%-They give equal attention to all sports

86%-They give preference to revenue earning sports (baseball, basketball, football) and this should change

14%-They give preference to revenue earning sports but that is ok because that is what the public wants to hear about

4. Would you like to hear about the news and events of less mainstream sports including women’s sports, less mainstream men’s sports, and club sports?

71%-yes

0%-no

29%-indifferent

5. How likely are you to read an online sports blog?

29%-More likely if it is on Facebook

29%-More likely if it is on Tumblr

14%-Not likely in either place

29%-Equally likely in both places

Real Athletes Pose for Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Edition

image

In this years Sports Illustrated swim suit edition three professional athletes were photographed in body paint swim suits. Sports Illustrated traditionally has stuck with the typical model, tall and unhealthily skinny.  This year they tried something new. They had three professional athletes with athletic body types pose. These athletes were eleven time Olympic Medalist and swimmer Natalie Coughlin, LPGA golfer Natalie Gulbis, and soccer star Alex Morgan. 

Some women athletes of the past may be outraged that these young stars would ‘sell out’ by posing for Sports Illustrated’s male audience. They may say these women have great athletic success and skill and should not have to take off their clothes to receive a spot in this magazine.  

Our generation, I believe, sees things differently. The media everywhere we turn is telling young women that the ideal women is very tall, skinny, with wide hips, a big butt, large breasts, light skinned, and with no arm or leg muscles at all. Of course one person having all of these traits is biologically impossible which is why most magazines, commercials, and TV shows edit their photos and their models have cosmetic surgeries. These athletes posing in Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Edition shows young women what a healthy, strong, and successful woman looks like.

Now these photos were most likely photo shopped a great deal, but at least Sports Illustrated is allowing healthy and strong women in their pages. These women are also real people. We know them, we know their story, they are people to look up to.  As opposed to models who young women, no matter how hard they try, will never look like because they are fake. These athletes still fit many of the descriptions of society’s ‘ideal women’ , but we know that they got there through years of hard work, not dangerous dieting. 

Natalie puts it perfectly,  ”As beautiful as the supermodels are, I think it’s great to have different types of bodies. To have an athletic body in SI Swimsuit Issue, I think, is really important. SI is a sports magazine in the first place. So it’s nice to have balance between models and athletes” (contactmusic.com)

Written By Liz Collins

The Tribe Celebrates Women’s Athletics
Erica Walsh
 
Today William and Mary hosted the third annual Celebration of William and Mary’s  Women’s Athletics. Erica Walsh class of ’97, current Women’s Soccer Head Coach at Penn State and Assistant Coach for U.S. Women’s National Team, Silver Medalists at the 2011 World Cup was the keynote speaker. Lauran Kaplan, a basketball player from the Class of 2005, was awarded the One Tribe Award. Jo Ousterhout from the class of ‘76 was awarded, “Tribe Champion for LIFE Award for her leadership, integrity, fortitude and excellence in her highly successful professional career first in banking and then as the head of two different start-up companies. Most recently, Jo has been the CEO and co-founder of Metta Journeys, a philanthropic travel company that immerses donors in the onsite work of carefully selected partner organizations and communities they serve.  Jo has lived and worked in the US, Hong Kong, Tokyo, and London. She and her husband, Jeff Fergus, have recently moved from London to Washington DC, where Jo is working through various organizations to strengthen the voices and roles of women in US politics.”
It is great to see how athletics at William and Mary has given these women the strong foundations for successful lives of giving back to larger communities and strengthening the lives of many women. It is also great that our school has an event like this to celebrate the fact that we have women’s athletics. Lots of women paved the way for women’s athletics in college and it is fitting that we should have a day to show the world that we do not take this for granted. Senior Female athletes and coaches were invited to the event so that they could be inspired by the very successful and strong women who have come before them and to show that we truly are one tribe one family for life.

By Liz Collins

Ethical or not? Japan’s interesting take on national health improvement.

Come on Barack!

CLICK the Olympic Rings to read an article about the Gender Equality in Sports Discussion at the UN between Olympic officials, governments, and others.

CLICK the Olympic Rings to read an article about the Gender Equality in Sports Discussion at the UN between Olympic officials, governments, and others.

WMSportsEquality supports progressive ideas in sports, especially fashion

(Source: thegrandarchives, via nbaoffseason)

Masters Discussion About Female Membership

The Other Side of Things: Interviews with the sports that never make the papers
Sport: Rugby
Athlete: Robert “Joaquin” Edmonson



Rugby isn’t a typical American sport, what do you like most about it?

Well, just like all sports, I like being a part of something bigger than myself. Also, I love that after-game feeling when you’re covered in blood and sweat and you know you’ve accomplished something.

What other sports/activities do you like to participate in outside of rugby?
Basketball and soccer. They’re not as intense as rugby, in my opinion, but I still like to go the rec and play with my friends.

 
Who is your favorite famous athlete/team?

My favorite professional athlete is the rugby legend Jonah Lomu. In my opinion he’s the greatest athlete of all time. For my favorite team, I’d have to say the French rugby team Stade Toulouse RFC.

How has athletics helped you in other areas of your life?
 Being part of a team has always given me the chance to meet new people, many of them have become some of my closest friends. Also, I’ve developed a great work ethic from years of competition.

 
How do you feel rugby is supported on campus?

I feel like the student body that knows about us comes out to support us, but since there isn’t much publicity for our team we don’t get many fans. I’d like to see a lot more people out there with us and definitely more recognition on campus. Not many people know we’re Virginia State champions and a top 10 team in the country for Division 3.


Do you have a saying or motto you live by?
Pain is weakness leaving your body.

 

Where do you get your inspiration from?
My best friend, Jamal. He was the one who first got me into the sport and he now plays rugby for American International College.

 

Will you continue with rugby after college?
Hell yeah! I’m going to play for Augusta RFC in my free time. They’re a semi-professional rugby team in Augusta, Georgia.

 

What do you think is a main stereotype towards your sport?
Most people think rugby is just a brutish sport with little to no talent involved. They have no idea how tactical and skilful the game really is.

 

Changing subjects a little, how do you feel about coverage of women’s sports in the news such as ESPN?
Women’s sports, especially women’s soccer, should be covered much more. Just last week we beat Brazil and it made less time on air than what Charles Barkley ate for breakfast.

 

What do you think could be done to gain further gender equality in sports on campus?
 Getting information and promotion out there about our women’s sports. I love going to our women’s basketball games but I never see a particularly large audience.

The Other Side of Things: Interviews with the sports that never make the papers

Sport: Rugby

Athlete: Robert “Joaquin” Edmonson


Rugby isn’t a typical American sport, what do you like most about it?

Well, just like all sports, I like being a part of something bigger than myself. Also, I love that after-game feeling when you’re covered in blood and sweat and you know you’ve accomplished something.


What other sports/activities do you like to participate in outside of rugby?

Basketball and soccer. They’re not as intense as rugby, in my opinion, but I still like to go the rec and play with my friends.

 

Who is your favorite famous athlete/team?

My favorite professional athlete is the rugby legend Jonah Lomu. In my opinion he’s the greatest athlete of all time. For my favorite team, I’d have to say the French rugby team Stade Toulouse RFC.


How has athletics helped you in other areas of your life?

Being part of a team has always given me the chance to meet new people, many of them have become some of my closest friends. Also, I’ve developed a great work ethic from years of competition.

 

How do you feel rugby is supported on campus?

I feel like the student body that knows about us comes out to support us, but since there isn’t much publicity for our team we don’t get many fans. I’d like to see a lot more people out there with us and definitely more recognition on campus. Not many people know we’re Virginia State champions and a top 10 team in the country for Division 3.


Do you have a saying or motto you live by?

Pain is weakness leaving your body.

 

Where do you get your inspiration from?

My best friend, Jamal. He was the one who first got me into the sport and he now plays rugby for American International College.

 

Will you continue with rugby after college?

Hell yeah! I’m going to play for Augusta RFC in my free time. They’re a semi-professional rugby team in Augusta, Georgia.

 

What do you think is a main stereotype towards your sport?

Most people think rugby is just a brutish sport with little to no talent involved. They have no idea how tactical and skilful the game really is.

 

Changing subjects a little, how do you feel about coverage of women’s sports in the news such as ESPN?

Women’s sports, especially women’s soccer, should be covered much more. Just last week we beat Brazil and it made less time on air than what Charles Barkley ate for breakfast.

 

What do you think could be done to gain further gender equality in sports on campus?

Getting information and promotion out there about our women’s sports. I love going to our women’s basketball games but I never see a particularly large audience.

Interview With Brandy Stover-a freshman gymnast from New Albany Indiana who recently won the Beam at the ECAC Championships.
Kris Yeager: Congratulations at the ECAC championships! How did it feel to get first place on the Beam as a freshman?
Brandy Stover: It was exciting and definitely unexpected. I felt really good being able to represent the Tribe like that.
Kris: What was your mental preparation like before the beam? Do you get nervous?

Brandy: I don’t really get nervous because I do a lot of mental sets beforehand. So it’s just another beam routine.  It’s not a big deal (laughs).
Kris: Can you go through your work out schedule for a typical practice and week?

Brandy: Yeah we just come in and get warmed up and we normally have three events each day. So we go to that event hit our assignment. When we get done we do conditioning then hit the training room. And we workout three and a half hours a day five days a week.
Kris: What motivates you to go into the gym everyday? Who or what do you draw your inspiration from?

Brandy: Motivation-I think is just automatically there because gymnastics is something I’ve always done and always loved. Inspiration-I think is kind of the same deal. I’m where I wanted to be my whole life doing college gymnastics. That draws me through each practice.
Kris: Do you have a favorite gymnast of all time? Why?
Brandy: I do. It’s someone hardly anybody knows because it’s a girl I grew up watching. She graduated and went to West Virginia and came back and coached me. Her name was Jennae Cox.
Kris: So your younger sister will be coming to William and Mary next year as I found out. How do you feel about that? How have you and your sister bonded over gymnastics?
Brandy: Well, for one I’m really excited. I’m so glad she chose to come here. And bonded…I guess the fact that we spent all that time there [the gym] not only just practicing but we also worked there together and my whole family’s involved. I think it just made us closer.
Kris: How has your family been involved in gymnastics?
Brandy: Well, my two sisters and my little brother both do it. My mom coaches, we all clean the gym, and my dad does any extra work that needs to be done.
Kris: What other sports/activities do you like to participate in outside of gymnastics?
Brandy: Now not a whole lot other than running. I really like to run. I used to play softball up until about two years ago. My whole family did it. It was a lot of fun.
Kris: What do you think are some of the stereotypes surrounding women’s gymnastics? How accurate or inaccurate do you think they are?
Brandy: As far as stereotypes, I think most people just don’t know exactly what the sport entails and how much work we put into it. I think people couple gymnastics with other sports that don’t really do it justice.
Kris: What about something that often gets linked with gymnastics like eating disorders or being too physically demanding at a young age?Brandy: I think it’s definitely something that occurs in this sport. It’s nothing that I’ve been around that much just because my coach was very adamant about not making that a problem you know. But yeah it’s something that always there because there’s always that pressure of having that typical gymnast body image.
Kris: How do you feel the media covers and represents your sport or women’s sports in general? What do you think can be done about this? From my experience gymnastics seems to be only popular every four years…















Brandy: Yeah the Olympics. I feel like that’s the only time people really get to see what this sport entails and they’re like wow this is really impressive but then after the Olympics is over it just falls by the wayside again and its just another sport.
Kris: How well is the atmosphere at William and Mary for gender equality and equal representation in sport?







Brandy: I think William and Mary is definitely one of the colleges that actually is more accepting of equality. I know I feel like they try to make them both equally represented but I feel like no matter what guys are just so more supported in general just because that’s just how it’s always been.













 

Interview With Brandy Stover-a freshman gymnast from New Albany Indiana who recently won the Beam at the ECAC Championships.

Kris Yeager: Congratulations at the ECAC championships! How did it feel to get first place on the Beam as a freshman?

Brandy Stover: It was exciting and definitely unexpected. I felt really good being able to represent the Tribe like that.

Kris: What was your mental preparation like before the beam? Do you get nervous?

Brandy: I don’t really get nervous because I do a lot of mental sets beforehand. So it’s just another beam routine.  It’s not a big deal (laughs).

Kris: Can you go through your work out schedule for a typical practice and week?

Brandy: Yeah we just come in and get warmed up and we normally have three events each day. So we go to that event hit our assignment. When we get done we do conditioning then hit the training room. And we workout three and a half hours a day five days a week.

Kris: What motivates you to go into the gym everyday? Who or what do you draw your inspiration from?

Brandy: Motivation-I think is just automatically there because gymnastics is something I’ve always done and always loved. Inspiration-I think is kind of the same deal. I’m where I wanted to be my whole life doing college gymnastics. That draws me through each practice.

Kris: Do you have a favorite gymnast of all time? Why?

Brandy: I do. It’s someone hardly anybody knows because it’s a girl I grew up watching. She graduated and went to West Virginia and came back and coached me. Her name was Jennae Cox.

Kris: So your younger sister will be coming to William and Mary next year as I found out. How do you feel about that? How have you and your sister bonded over gymnastics?

Brandy: Well, for one I’m really excited. I’m so glad she chose to come here. And bonded…I guess the fact that we spent all that time there [the gym] not only just practicing but we also worked there together and my whole family’s involved. I think it just made us closer.

Kris: How has your family been involved in gymnastics?

Brandy: Well, my two sisters and my little brother both do it. My mom coaches, we all clean the gym, and my dad does any extra work that needs to be done.

Kris: What other sports/activities do you like to participate in outside of gymnastics?

Brandy: Now not a whole lot other than running. I really like to run. I used to play softball up until about two years ago. My whole family did it. It was a lot of fun.

Kris: What do you think are some of the stereotypes surrounding women’s gymnastics? How accurate or inaccurate do you think they are?

Brandy: As far as stereotypes, I think most people just don’t know exactly what the sport entails and how much work we put into it. I think people couple gymnastics with other sports that don’t really do it justice.

Kris: What about something that often gets linked with gymnastics like eating disorders or being too physically demanding at a young age?Brandy: I think it’s definitely something that occurs in this sport. It’s nothing that I’ve been around that much just because my coach was very adamant about not making that a problem you know. But yeah it’s something that always there because there’s always that pressure of having that typical gymnast body image.

Kris: How do you feel the media covers and represents your sport or women’s sports in general? What do you think can be done about this? From my experience gymnastics seems to be only popular every four years…

Brandy: Yeah the Olympics. I feel like that’s the only time people really get to see what this sport entails and they’re like wow this is really impressive but then after the Olympics is over it just falls by the wayside again and its just another sport.

Kris: How well is the atmosphere at William and Mary for gender equality and equal representation in sport?

Brandy: I think William and Mary is definitely one of the colleges that actually is more accepting of equality. I know I feel like they try to make them both equally represented but I feel like no matter what guys are just so more supported in general just because that’s just how it’s always been.